NM Legislature Enacts Multiple Changes to Tax Law

  |  April 5, 2019

On April 4, New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham signed House Bill 6 into law, initiating complex changes to New Mexico tax laws over a two-year period, some of which are effective immediately and others that will be phased in thru July 2026.

The new laws include changes to the personal income tax, corporate income tax, gross receipts tax (GRT), and several excise taxes. Here are some key provisions of the bill that affect New Mexico’s taxpayers. Read more. Read More

Governor Lujan Grisham Signs Lodgers Tax Bill

  |  February 20, 2019

On February 4, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham signed Senate Bill 106 into law, closing the tax loophole that had allowed property owners to avoid paying Lodgers Tax on revenue generated by short-term rental of their properties. The bill, which was very similar to legislation drafted during the 2017 session, passed both the House and Senate with overwhelming support. Read more. Read More

Sales and Use Taxes Account for Largest Net State Tax Increases in 2018

  |  February 11, 2019

The wheels of the Wayfair decision are turning across the U.S.

Federal tax changes had a ripple effect across many states in 2018. In fact, 13 states saw net increases to their sales and use taxes, as stated by a recent report from the National Conference of State Legislatures. In comparison, 10 states reported net decreases. While relatively on track with trends in recent years, these changes accounted for the most significant net tax increase at the state level, up by $847.1 million.

According to the report, 2018 proved to be a year of many challenges and opportunities in regards to taxes. Read more. Read More

California Is On Board with Wayfair

  |  December 19, 2018

In the beginning of what may become a national rollout of the landmark South Dakota v. Wayfair Supreme Court decision from this past June, the state of California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA) has announced its intention to use the Wayfair thresholds beginning April 1, 2019. “We know the legislature is also looking closely at this issue and we look forward to working with them as we proceed,” said Nick Maduros, CDTFA Director.

Starting April 1, out-of-state retailers selling above certain economic thresholds into California will be required to collect California use taxes on their sales into California. Read more. Read More

Does the South Dakota v. Wayfair Decision Mean Economic Opportunities for Tribes?

  |  October 9, 2018

In its decision on South Dakota v. Wayfair on June 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a 1992 precedent that excused out-of-state retailers from collecting and remitting state sales tax when selling products to residents of a state. The seller was only required to collect sales tax if they had a physical presence such as a brick-and-mortar store or an employee within the buyer’s state legal boundaries.

With the recent ruling, physical presence is no longer required for a state to impose a sales tax on sellers, and states stand to collect potentially billions of dollars in sales taxes from remote sellers. While states aim to maximize a potential windfall of new tax revenue, tribes should be exploring the impact on their sales tax collection. Read more. Read More

Four States File Lawsuit to Nullify New Limit on SALT Deduction

  |  August 16, 2018

As part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the Act), the limitation imposed on the state and local tax (SALT) deduction as part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) has wreaked havoc in many states. In fact, four states – Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and Maryland – have determined that the limitation is unconstitutional. On July 17, they filed a lawsuit in federal court that seeks to make the law unenforceable. Read more. Read More

Wayfair Decision Will Have Wide Ranging Implications for Companies Doing Business in Multiple States

  |  July 10, 2018

In a 5-4 ruling on June 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a 1992 precedent that barred states from requiring an out-of-state seller with no physical presence to collect sales tax on a sale to a resident of the state. Now, states stand to collect potentially billions of dollars in sales taxes from remote sellers who meet certain minimum standards. The Court remanded the case to South Dakota’s Supreme Court for a finding of whether other issues may block the tax. However, it is unlikely that any issues will surface.

In overturning Quill Corp. v. North Dakota and National Bellas Hess, Inc. v. Department of Revenue of Ill., the Court acknowledged that brick-and-mortar stores have been at a competitive disadvantage to out-of-state sellers. And as technology has become more involved in commerce year after year, it has created incentive for states to challenge the physical presence nexus rule. Read more. Read More

South Dakota Wins in Supreme Court Decision on South Dakota v. Wayfair

  |  June 21, 2018

The U.S. Supreme Court today handed down a decision on the highly anticipated South Dakota v. Wayfair case, which challenged South Dakota’s collection of sales tax from out-of-state businesses that do not have physical presence in the state but that sell and deliver into South Dakota tangible personal property, products transferred electronically, or services.

South Dakota passed a law in 2016 that set off a dramatic and market-altering shift in taxation of online sales, one that concluded with today’s Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision... read more. Read More